Occupational Health Professional

Refine and apply policies and programs to ensure safe and healthy work conditions, assist injured staff with workers' compensation and rehabilitation.

Occupational Health Professional

Occupational Health Professional

Roles and responsibilities

If this is your chosen career you will:

  • develop, implement and review environmental health management plans and occupational health and safety plans
  • prepare and implement plans and strategies for the safe, economic and suitable disposal of commercial, industrial, medical and household wastes
  • advise on and enforce legislation
  • implement prevention programs and strategies for communicable diseases; food safety; waste water treatment and disposal systems; recreation and domestic water quality; contaminated and hazardous substances; and for minimising air, sea, water and noise pollution to improve health outcomes
  • identify hazards and assess and control risks in the workplace
  • develop, implement and monitor programs minimising workplace and environmental pollution involving chemical and physical hazards
  • promote ergonomic principles within the workplace, such as matching furniture, equipment and work activities to the needs of employees
  • inspect and audit workplaces, processes, plant, and chemical and physical hazards for legislative compliance
  • train employees in personal protective equipment and safe working procedures
  • record and investigate injuries and equipment damage, and reporting safety performance
  • coordinate the return of injured workers into the workplace

Occupational and environmental health professionals work in both the private and public sectors.

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

If this is your chosen career you will:

  • develop, implement and review environmental health management plans and occupational health and safety plans
  • prepare and implement plans and strategies for the safe, economic and suitable disposal of commercial, industrial, medical and household wastes
  • advise on and enforce legislation
  • implement prevention programs and strategies for communicable diseases; food safety; waste water treatment and disposal systems; recreation and domestic water quality; contaminated and hazardous substances; and for minimising air, sea, water and noise pollution to improve health outcomes
  • identify hazards and assess and control risks in the workplace
  • develop, implement and monitor programs minimising workplace and environmental pollution involving chemical and physical hazards
  • promote ergonomic principles within the workplace, such as matching furniture, equipment and work activities to the needs of employees
  • inspect and audit workplaces, processes, plant, and chemical and physical hazards for legislative compliance
  • train employees in personal protective equipment and safe working procedures
  • record and investigate injuries and equipment damage, and reporting safety performance
  • coordinate the return of injured workers into the workplace

Occupational and environmental health professionals work in both the private and public sectors.

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Undergraduate Courses To Become

Occupational Health Professional

Postgraduate Courses To Become

Occupational Health Professional

Postgraduate study is not necessarily required for this occupation, but may be helpful for career advancement.

Relevant postgraduate courses include: