Translator

Convert the writings of one language to another, retaining the precise meaning of the original text.

Translator

Translator

Roles and responsibilities

As a translator, you will find job opportunities in federal, state and territory government departments concerned with immigration, legal issues and law enforcement, social security and education. Organisations such as hospitals, banks, airlines, publishers, media outlets and immigration, education and tourism agencies will also offer exciting job opportunities for you.

Translating occupations are in high demand, with increasing needs in major world languages. In Australia, the languages in demand change from time to time, particularly in relation to recent immigration arrivals. Thanks to advanced technology, translators also work across boundaries and are able to respond to demands from all over the world. Most translators in Australia work as freelancers, casuals or contractors, with some bilingual professionals working in large corporations and media.

Translators:

  • study the original text to understand the meaning and convert it into another language in a way that conveys the original meaning, spirit and feeling
  • use dictionaries and other technologies to determine meanings of words and phrases, and to establish their closest equivalent in the target language
  • translate a wide range of written material, including business letters, application forms, novels or detailed scientific articles
  • make sure that phraseology and terminology in legal, technical and scientific texts are accurately translated
  • supply subtitles for films and television programs in languages other than English
  • revise translations done by others
  • abide by a professional code of ethics

Source: myFuture

As a translator, you will find job opportunities in federal, state and territory government departments concerned with immigration, legal issues and law enforcement, social security and education. Organisations such as hospitals, banks, airlines, publishers, media outlets and immigration, education and tourism agencies will also offer exciting job opportunities for you.

Translating occupations are in high demand, with increasing needs in major world languages. In Australia, the languages in demand change from time to time, particularly in relation to recent immigration arrivals. Thanks to advanced technology, translators also work across boundaries and are able to respond to demands from all over the world. Most translators in Australia work as freelancers, casuals or contractors, with some bilingual professionals working in large corporations and media.

Translators:

  • study the original text to understand the meaning and convert it into another language in a way that conveys the original meaning, spirit and feeling
  • use dictionaries and other technologies to determine meanings of words and phrases, and to establish their closest equivalent in the target language
  • translate a wide range of written material, including business letters, application forms, novels or detailed scientific articles
  • make sure that phraseology and terminology in legal, technical and scientific texts are accurately translated
  • supply subtitles for films and television programs in languages other than English
  • revise translations done by others
  • abide by a professional code of ethics

Source: myFuture

Postgraduate Courses To Become

Translator

Postgraduate study is not required for this occupation, but may be helpful for career advancement.
Relevant postgraduate courses include: