Anthropologist

Develop skills to enable you to explore origin, development and functioning of human societies and cultures.

Anthropologist

Anthropologist

Roles and responsibilities

Anthropologists work in different communities to gather and analyse information on social and cultural behaviour, artefacts, language and biology of groups and societies which they are studying collect, identify, date, protect and preserve indigenous artefacts, material possessions and other objects of anthropological interest.

The major employers of Anthropologists are universities, museums and government departments concerned with Aboriginal welfare and Native Title, immigration and ethnic affairs, multiculturalism and social services.
 
In addition to these areas, you could also be employed by development and conservation organisations, including United Nations agencies and other non-government organisations. There are also opportunities for graduates with a background in anthropology to work as secondary teachers while a smaller number of graduates are employed by universities as part-time tutors while they seek to gain postgraduate qualifications.
 
A growing number of positions are available at Aboriginal Land Council offices, or in research relating to Native Title claims and heritage clearance. Positions are advertised in government gazettes, newspapers, professional journals and on various websites. In recent times, there has been an increase in anthropological consultancy work funded by both government and private industry and a number of anthropological and/or archaeological companies have been formed.

Source: myFuture

Anthropologists work in different communities to gather and analyse information on social and cultural behaviour, artefacts, language and biology of groups and societies which they are studying collect, identify, date, protect and preserve indigenous artefacts, material possessions and other objects of anthropological interest.

The major employers of Anthropologists are universities, museums and government departments concerned with Aboriginal welfare and Native Title, immigration and ethnic affairs, multiculturalism and social services.
 
In addition to these areas, you could also be employed by development and conservation organisations, including United Nations agencies and other non-government organisations. There are also opportunities for graduates with a background in anthropology to work as secondary teachers while a smaller number of graduates are employed by universities as part-time tutors while they seek to gain postgraduate qualifications.
 
A growing number of positions are available at Aboriginal Land Council offices, or in research relating to Native Title claims and heritage clearance. Positions are advertised in government gazettes, newspapers, professional journals and on various websites. In recent times, there has been an increase in anthropological consultancy work funded by both government and private industry and a number of anthropological and/or archaeological companies have been formed.

Source: myFuture

Undergraduate Courses To Become

Anthropologist

Recommended major/s to pursue this career
Relevant majors include:
Postgraduate Courses To Become

Anthropologist

Course work courses to pursue this career
Postgraduate study is generally required for this occupation.
Postgraduate Courses To Become

Anthropologist

Research courses to pursue this career

Research study is not necessarily required for this occupation, but may be helpful for career advancement.

Relevant research courses include: