Archaeologist

Examine the remains of human cultures to uncover the history, customs and lifestyles of previous inhabitants.

Archaeologist

Archaeologist

Roles and responsibilities

Archaeologists:

  • survey, map and record archaeological sites
  • develop research processes
  • organise and carry out excavations, field surveys and surface collections
  • clean, conserve, restore, reconstruct and display material found at archaeological sites
  • photograph and/or draw features and artefacts on-site and during post-excavation analysis
  • analyse the finds through a variety of means including physical and chemical techniques and documentary research
  • document the information obtained from the findings in a concise report
  • advise individuals and groups on heritage matters, including conservation options and legal provisions
  • prepare material for publication
Traditionally, archaeologists have been employed as academics in universities and museums.
 
More recently, archaeologists have also worked as consultants and cultural heritage managers, often on a part-time basis. Consultancy work involves research, fieldwork, report writing and liaison with clients and stakeholders. As a cultural heritage manager, you could also be employed in federal and state government departments.

Competition for positions is strong and only the most-qualified graduates can expect to be successful. Undertaking relevant voluntary work may increase the possibility of you gaining a job in this field.

Source: myFuture

Archaeologists:

  • survey, map and record archaeological sites
  • develop research processes
  • organise and carry out excavations, field surveys and surface collections
  • clean, conserve, restore, reconstruct and display material found at archaeological sites
  • photograph and/or draw features and artefacts on-site and during post-excavation analysis
  • analyse the finds through a variety of means including physical and chemical techniques and documentary research
  • document the information obtained from the findings in a concise report
  • advise individuals and groups on heritage matters, including conservation options and legal provisions
  • prepare material for publication
Traditionally, archaeologists have been employed as academics in universities and museums.
 
More recently, archaeologists have also worked as consultants and cultural heritage managers, often on a part-time basis. Consultancy work involves research, fieldwork, report writing and liaison with clients and stakeholders. As a cultural heritage manager, you could also be employed in federal and state government departments.

Competition for positions is strong and only the most-qualified graduates can expect to be successful. Undertaking relevant voluntary work may increase the possibility of you gaining a job in this field.

Source: myFuture

Undergraduate Courses To Become

Archaeologist

Postgraduate Courses To Become

Archaeologist

Course work courses to pursue this career
Postgraduate study is generally required for this occupation.
Postgraduate Courses To Become

Archaeologist

Research courses to pursue this career
Research study is not necessarily required for this occupation, but may be helpful for career advancement.

Relevant research courses include: